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2021: Review of the Year

Magnum Photographers share their work from the last 12 months, providing a broad review of 2021.

Magnum Photographers

As 2021 draws to a close, Magnum asked its photographers to share photos, texts, films and more that provided a reflection on the year. Here you can find, in alphabetical order, work from, or relating to the past 12 months that shares the many perspectives and activities of members, associates and nominees.

Khalik Allah

“In 2021 I kept my head down and focused on my work. I’m blessed to have remained safe amidst the uptick in NYC violence and to have remained healthy whilst continuing on my path in photography. I was also blessed to have worked with Nas and Solange Knowles on different commercial projects; in addition, I shot some editorial work for New York Magazine. Altogether I am grateful for the experiences I have had this year.”

Khalik Allah QueensBridge Houses Projects. Queens, New York City. USA 2021. © Khalik Allah | Magnum Photos
Khalik Allah Olivia. From the "125th and Lexington" series. Harlem, New York City. USA 2021. © Khalik Allah | Magnum Photos
Khalik Allah Frenchie. From the "125th and Lexington" series. Harlem, New York City. USA 2021. © Khalik Allah | Magnum Photos
Khalik Allah Nas on the set of "Rare" music video. New Jersey. USA 2021. © Khalik Allah | Magnum Photos
Khalik Allah Nas on the set of "Rare" music video. New Jersey. USA 2021. © Khalik Allah | Magnum Photos

Olivia Arthur

I spent time this year making The Stop Game, a docufiction film about a woman who is walking the Camino Santiago to be released from the care of the state after a period in prison.

Jacob Aue Sobol

The original meaning of the name Isaac is “he will laugh”. We decided on this name when his mother Sara burst into laughter as the midwife told her that we would have a son – somehow we were both convinced that we would have another daughter. Little did we know that Isaac would take his name literally and actually make his mother laugh when opening his eyes for the first time.
Jacob Aue Sobol The Birth of Isaac Aue Sobol. Onsevig, Lolland, Denmark. October 31st, 01:45. © Jacob Aue Sobol | Magnum Photos

Bruno Barbey

Bruno Barbey left us on November 9th. After his death, I was first obliged to make an inventory of all his work. After these 6 months of work. Didier Bernheim asked me to prepare the scenography of a large exhibition of 57 works that was planned in the museum of Qingdao in China. He went there to hang this exhibition. These works are part of the book “Color of China” that Bruno had published in Beijing by the publisher POST WAVE in Chinese in 2019. The exhibition took place in July-August and September 2021. It will return next year in Paris.

Bruno Barbey YuYuan Gardens, Shanghai, China.1980. © Bruno Barbey | Magnum Photos
Bruno Barbey Young children in the suburbs doing their morning exercise before school. Shanghai, China. 1980. © Bruno Barbey | Magnum Photos
Bruno Barbey Near Changshou, down the Yangtse river, east of Chonguing. China. 1980. © Bruno Barbey | Magnum Photos
Bruno Barbey The foot of a Buddhist statue, built in the 8th century from a rock cliff (72 meters high). Loshan, Sichuan province, China. © Bruno Barbey | Magnum Photos

Zied Ben Romaine

In the region of Zinder, Niger, I spent ten days capturing the lives, cultures and habits of the people navigating climate change, malnutrition, malaria and socio-economic challenges.

Zied Ben Romdhane Belbeja, Zinder, Niger. 24 July 2021 © Zied Ben Romdhane | Magnum Photos
Zied Ben Romdhane Belbeja, Zinder, Niger. 24 July 2021 © Zied Ben Romdhane | Magnum Photos
Zied Ben Romdhane The use of mosquito nets to protect against malaria. Belbeja, Zinder, Niger. 27 July 2021 © Zied Ben Romdhane | Magnum Photos
Zied Ben Romdhane Nomadic Tuareg. Zinder, Niger. 25July 2021 © Zied Ben Romdhane | Magnum Photos
Zied Ben Romdhane Zinder, Niger. 5 August 2021. © Zied Ben Romdhane | Magnum Photos

Jonas Bendiksen

Before and after pictures from the Book of Veles – the book published this year that explores the themes of misinformation and the media.

The small Macedonian town of Veles (population ca 50 000) placed itself on the world map during the US elections in 2016, when it became an epicentre for the production of fake news. Looking for a way to make money, local youth created hundreds of “news” websites that emulated American political news portals, with names such as NYTimesPolitics.com, Trump365.com, USAnewsflash.com. These were spread to millions through Facebook and Twitter, and while the local youth made good money from the resulting Google ad revenues, they could also have inadvertently have had an impact on the election of Donald Trump.

Facebook and Twitter changed their algorithms to shut down such activities, but several of the Veles operators were found to have been active in the 2020 Trump vs Biden election as well.

The Book of Veles is an exploration of the possibilities of digitally manufactured imagery, with every picture being subject to manipulation.

Matt Black

After six years of near-constant movement, 2021 became a time to put things together and make sense of, or at least clarify, the accumulation of images, texts, sounds, and memories formed while completing and publishing my book American Geography this year.  One was the over 3,000 objects I gathered as I traveled across the country. Like strange talismans, these objects carried a truth about American life, but first I had to learn their language.

Matt Black Panhandling sign. From Matt Black’s book American Geography. © Matt Black | Magnum Photos
Matt Black Discarded cigarette pack. From Matt Black’s book American Geography. © Matt Black | Magnum Photos
Matt Black Discarded wire. From Matt Black’s book American Geography. © Matt Black | Magnum Photos
Matt Black Discarded wire. From Matt Black’s book American Geography. © Matt Black | Magnum Photos
Matt Black Discarded silverware. From Matt Black’s book American Geography. © Matt Black | Magnum Photos

Myriam Boulos

The first image is my grandmother’s hand. When I gave her this tiny flower, my grandmother told me “Dis aux arbres de sourire”, which means: tell the trees to smile.

The second image was the first time I didn’t associate the port with the explosion. It was a full moon. The view was beautiful.

My grandmother left us the day I met 3ammo Michel.

The third image, in the video, is a picture of the hearing aid 3ammo Michel was wearing on the day of the explosion. The audio is a fragment of conversation he had with sound artist Nour Sokhon and I. 

The fourth image is part of my new and ongoing project on women’s sexual fantasies. Rianna told me: “I fantasize to be with someone who understands I have trauma connected to sex and men. I also fantasize about being more assertive and blunt in bed, rather than being so shy. Telling him exactly what I want and where I want it. Being the fierce, sexy bitch, I am in my head.” For me working on this project is a way of resisting everything that is imposed to us in Lebanon. 

Enri Canaj

Enri Canaj Summer morning - on the train towards the capital. Italy, July 2021 © Enri Canaj | Magnum Photos
Enri Canaj A group of 35 people accommodated in a hotel in Northern Macedonia while waiting for their documents to be completed to travel to Greece. Among them are two women politicians, a former employee of (...)
Enri Canaj Steel factory in Luleå's suburb. Sweden, October 2021 © Enri Canaj | Magnum Photos
Enri Canaj Area in Poland near the border with Belarus have been declared an emergency zone. Kuznice 12 November 2021 Poland. © Enri Canaj | Magnum Photos
Enri Canaj Devastating summer fires aftermath in Evia. November 2021 © Enri Canaj | Magnum Photos
Enri Canaj Workers' crews cut down burned pines, what is left from the devastating summer fires in Evia. November 2021 © Enri Canaj | Magnum Photos

Chien-Chi Chang

Four Pictures and a short film from a zero-contact-two-week quarantine in a Taipei hotel.

Cristina de Middel

In 2021 I finished shooting one of my longest and also most delicate projects, Journey to the Center, an attempt to shift the perception of migrants by presenting their journey as an adventure that only the bravest would dare to take. I find it quite symbolic that I finished this personal journey of research precisely in such a challenging year, where lessons came from all sides and of all calibers. Luckily, the brotherhood of those who travel to reach a better place, geographical or personal, is a strong one, and it provides the necessary strength to cope with the fear that wraps you when walking an unfamiliar path. As migrants of life, the new and the different should be our allies and we should turn deaf ears to the sirens songs of populism and tradition of power whose only mission is to make us stagnate forever.

Bieke Depoorter

THE LINE is a collaboration between with Gideon Jacobs. We explored the phenomenon of boundaries, the way humans consciously and unconsciously map their lives with limits. Born from a two week residency at Het Lijsternest in Ingooigem, Belgium, the work is anchored by a fictional narrative that unfolds via audio, text, photographs, and video as the audience listens to the story. This narrative, based on true stories – I grew up in Ingooigem – follows the life of a middle aged woman who accidentally stumbles upon her most profound line, a strange boundary many kilometers from where she lives, that she, mysteriously, cannot cross. The project, in blurring the line between the real and imagined, creates a surreal experience that asks the audience to reflect on their own lines, the ones they have drawn or found, the ones they know or have yet to discover.

During the two week residency, I found my own line that I couldn’t cross in my childhood town. As the woman in the story does, I walked the line several times a day, documented each walk meticulously until one night, I crossed it together with my mother.

Thomas Dworzak

As the chaotic, final US withdrawal from Afghanistan happened in late August, I finished my book on the decade-long, complicated involvement of the Georgian Army. The book „Khidi“- The Bridge, shows my photos as a feature movie script, written by Dutch writers and directors Ineke Smits and Jeroen Stout. It follows a fictional unit as it defends a bridge from insurgents “in a war that maybe isn’t theirs.”

Nikos Economopoulos

These images of this odd year start with the quarantine that brought me near my birthplace in the south of Greece, and end with a short journey to Mexico for the day of the dead.

Stuart Franklin

I am photographing wayside chapels in southern Europe. It’s really a landscape project, about how these sacred sites were placed: in forest groves, in caves, on high ground. It’s a journey that began in Malta this year mainly because these chapels were historically important during previous (eg 19th century) pandemics vis. cholera and bubonic plague. Am awaiting some funding to continue the work next year.

Stuart Franklin Santu Pietru Parish Church, Gharb, Gozo. Malta. 2021. © Stuart Franklin | Magnum Photos
Stuart Franklin Santu Pietru Parish Church, Gharb, Gozo, Malta. 2021 © Stuart Franklin | Magnum Photos
Stuart Franklin Church of the Immaculate Conception, Qala, Gozo, Malta. 2021. © Stuart Franklin | Magnum Photos
Stuart Franklin Restored 17th century chapel - Our Lady of Mercy. Qrendi, Malta. 2021. © Stuart Franklin | Magnum Photos
Stuart Franklin St Bartholomew's chapel. Rabat, Malta. 2021. © Stuart Franklin | Magnum Photos

Bruce Gilden

I chose these 5 images because I like them! Two of them, taken in Brooklyn, are part of a long-term personal project. Another one was taken at the beach in Palermo on a commission on which unfortunately I couldn’t work more than 2 days this summer 2021, and that hopefully I will continue next summer. The last two photographs of fishermen were taken in a remote island of South Korea in October 2021 on a commission from Magnum and Shinan County. I have to say that I had a wonderful time working there (and my wife said that I was really sweet!).

Jim Goldberg

The selection of photographs are from two different commissions in 2021. In New York I collaborated with BOYY – a handbag and accessory brand that has committed to celebrating all gender identities and expressions. The campaign itself captured a spectrum of emerging and established artists whose perspectives underscored BOYY’s gender-fluid approach.

For two years I have been creating work in Arkansas as a part of the Picturing the South commission with the High Museum of Atlanta. In the small river town of Augusta I explored the town’s landscape, architecture, and familial ties as well as the delicate dynamics of lineage and land ownership. I was repeatedly drawn to the White River, which was the economic lifeblood of Augusta until the turn of the twentieth century, and still remains a vital part of daily life. In the river’s many whirlpools created by opposing currents, I found a metaphor for tensions within the community and in the country at large.

Jim Goldberg Hailey and Whitney, Right of way Road, Augusta, Arkansas, USA, 2021 © Jim Goldberg | Magnum Photos
Jim Goldberg Calvin Brown in Front of The Northside Church of Christ, Augusta, Arkansas, USA, 2021 © Jim Goldberg | Magnum Photos
Jim Goldberg Babbie Asleep, McCrory, Arkansas, USA, 202 © Jim Goldberg | Magnum Photos
Jim Goldberg Controlled Burn, Wynn, Arkansas, USA, 2021 © Jim Goldberg | Magnum Photos
Jim Goldberg Dreamy, Efron Danzig, Brooklyn, New York, USA, 2021 © Jim Goldberg | Magnum Photos
Jim Goldberg Most Dearest, Collier Schorr, Brooklyn, New York, USA, 20 © Jim Goldberg | Magnum Photos

Harry Gruyaert

Harry Gruyaert Maison du Brésil by Le Corbusier.

Cité Universitaire Internationale, Paris, France 2021 © Harry Gruyaert | Magnum Photos
Harry Gruyaert Bonnard painting projections during Monet, Renoir… Chagall, Journeys Around the Mediterranean exhibition.

Bordeaux, France. 2021 © Harry Gruyaert | Magnum Photos

Nanna Heitmann

2021 was an intense year in Russia. Thousands of people took to the streets in support of the prisoner oppositional leader Alexei Navalny and, with that, many protestors were arrested. Since then, almost all the remaining independent media in Russia were declared as foreign agents: which means the enemy of the people. In the summer the maybe biggest forest fires in world history happened in Siberia. They were bigger than all other fires in the world combined and covered Yakutia in thick dense toxic smoke. The year ended with Dmitry Muratov and Novaya Gazeta being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. A little spark of hope the last independent newspaper in Russia will be able to continue telling the truth in 2022.

Nanna Heitmann Nobel Laureate Dmitry Muratov. Moscow, Russia. November 2021. © Nanna Heitmann | Magnum Photos for Nobel Peace Center © Nanna Heitmann | Magnum Photos
Nanna Heitmann Nobel Laureate Dmitry Muratov at his office at Novaya Gazeta.. Moscow, Russia. November 2021. © Nanna Heitmann | Magnum Photos for Nobel Peace Center © Nanna Heitmann | Magnum Photos
Nanna Heitmann Policeman at Pro Navalny Protest. The protests moved across time zones and more than 3,700 people were arrested in at least 109 cities. There were numerous reports of excessive use of force by (...)
Nanna Heitmann Local firefighting volunteers check the size of a forest fire. Only in the night the fire calms down a little due to humidity and the size of the fire becomes visible. The forest fires in Siberia m (...)
Nanna Heitmann Dragon flies catching mosquitos while a local volunteer firefighter is pumping water from a lake into a water truck before driving to a forest fire. The forest fires in Siberia might have been bigg (...)
Nanna Heitmann Fire fighters take a rest near Magaras. Siberia, Russia. 8 July, 2021. © Nanna Heitmann | Magnum Photos
Nanna Heitmann Russia.Siberia.July 1. 2021.

Local firefighting volunteers take a break for food in Magaras, Siberia. 1 July, 2021. © Nanna Heitmann | Magnum Photos
Nanna Heitmann Forest fire on the road between Magaras and Berdigestyakh. Yakutia, Russia. 8 July, 2021 © Nanna Heitmann | Magnum Photos

Sohrab Hura

In 2014, after receiving news of a predictable national elections result, I tried to scan myself into the computer. Even back then, it was easy to foresee the situation India finds itself in today, where we are governed by an irresponsible, dictatorial, and supremacist government. What was surprising, however, was a certain misplaced, widespread belief following the election. Now that Modi was prime minister of a union of states, thought many Indians, he would focus on ushering in an agenda led by development rather than the religious supremacy he had been known to propagate. Perhaps the image of a sea of Modi masks worn by people attending his political rallies helped instill the delusion that the fateful fire in Godhra in 2002—sparking months of deadly violence against Muslims in the Modi-led state of Gujarat—was only a distant memory. Or maybe the proliferation of pro-Modi WhatsApp forwards led people to compromise their morals. Even my parents, who were new to WhatsApp, expressed confusion when I’d point out doctored messages they shared with me. At the time, the slogan “Hindu Khatre Mein Hai” (Hindus are in danger) circulated widely. The words were often superimposed on an assortment of images of what looked to be a riot, with buses and tires set on fire. These images included people wearing white skullcaps—meant to reveal that Muslims were responsible for the purported violence. Back then it was still relatively easy to identify and verify the origins of those images, to clarify that old images from another part of the world had been stripped of their original context and presented differently. But because my parents knew that the images they received were sent by friends and relatives, they had an inherent trust in these images. Out of frustration, my first impulse was to remove myself from the people around me who were starting to feel increasingly zombie-like in their reception of the new authoritarian political reality. I decided to scan myself away into the computer. The digital space—outside of WhatsApp, that is—seemed like it could teleport me somewhere else quickest. But all I managed in the scanning endeavor was a warped self-portrait of my hand. It was an afterimage of a glitched attempt at escaping the future, a photograph that remained neither a document nor an abstraction, just an image stuck somewhere awkwardly in between.

To read the entire essay – please click here.

David Hurn

Richard Kalvar

If you asked me why I took these pictures and why I selected them, I would like to answer to the first part what Sir Edmund Hillary said when asked why he had wanted to climb Mt. Everest: “Because it was there”.  I photograph things great and small because I notice them, am attracted to them, and feel compelled to work with them.  And to the second part, I would say that they all work together but are also discrete entities, each telling its own ambiguous story.  The common thread is not the place or subject; it’s the same eye, heart, brain and finger that took them.

I would like to defend the idea that there’s a type of photography that is not trying to demonstrate, describe, or persuade, but rather to snatch instantaneous fragments of unmanipulated reality in order to create dramas, to some extent imaginary, that touch the human soul.

Richard Kalvar Le Choupinet restaurant, Boulevard St. Michel, closed to humans during Covid 19, is open only to bears, who enjoy watching people pass by. Paris, France. 2021. © Richard Kalvar | Magnum Photos
Richard Kalvar Printemps Photographique de Pomerol. Before the projections. Pomerol, France. 30 October, 2021. © Richard Kalvar | Magnum Photos
Richard Kalvar Bicycle shadows.Paris, France. 24 October, 2021. © Richard Kalvar | Magnum Photos
Richard Kalvar Art gallery opening. The musicians take a break. Ars-en-Ré, France. 18 August, 2021. © Richard Kalvar | Magnum Photos
Richard Kalvar Wedding. Champagne after the ceremony. Paris, France. 03 September 2021. © Richard Kalvar | Magnum Photos

William Keo

I chose these photos because they perfectly represent the themes I have been working on this year; Social exclusion, conflict, migration and victims of hatred. These are, I think, universal themes that cross borders and eras and are rooted in the very nature of our society and our humanity. In France or in Syria, I found these same themes with different people and different implications, like a kind of cycle. I sometimes like to step back and give more context; showing the people I photographed evolving in their landscapes often says a lot about their situation.

William Keo Streets of Raqqa, where electricity has returned after heavy fighting between Kurdish forces and Islamic State jihadists. According to the UN, 80% of the city's infrastructure has been destroyed. R (...)
William Keo Members of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) militia, composed mostly of YPG (People's Protection Units) arrest two suspected members of ISIS. Deir Ez-Zor, Syria. May 2021 © William Keo | Magnum Photos
William Keo Ransa and her daughter Rawla live in an apartment in Raqqa where there is very little water and frequent power cuts. Raqqa, Syria. May 2021. © William Keo | Magnum Photos
William Keo Migrants have settled in the forest, safe from the police. Grand Synthe, Dunkirk, France. 25 November, 2021. © William Keo | Magnum Photos
William Keo A man waiting for a bus at the Bobigny train station. Bobigny, France. 19 November 2021. © William Keo | Magnum Photos

Yael Martinez

Since 2013 I have been exploring the tangible and spiritual impact of violence on families in Mexico, including my own. My work focuses on communities fractured by the state and organized crime, in a physical and psychological sense. I am trying to create a testimony through which I can discuss all these layers of reality that shape my country.

I’m interested in exploring the symbolic construction of the territory where violence penetrates all and this violence crosses the physical and spiritual space of those who inhabit it. The territory as an analogy to a body or space that could be a house, a person, a family, a community or a country.

Montaña Estrella- Flor del Tiempo (Star Mountain – Flower of time) is the second chapter of my long-term project Firefly and opens my research around drugs and the poppy-producing communities of Guerrero Mexico; the state where I am originally from. 

Yael Martínez A man prays at an altar to the Virgin of Guadalupe and the Holy Cross. El Tepeyac Guerrero Mexico 12 December, 2020. Intervened photography. © Yael Martínez | Magnum Photos
Yael Martínez An elder in the Garza hill. Guerrero, Mexico 31 December 2020. © Yael Martínez | Magnum Photos
Yael Martínez Sacrifice. Every December 31, the Na Savi indigenous communities climb the Cerro de la Garza to perform rituals that commemorate the end and beginning of a cycle. Guerrero, Mexico. 31 December, 202 (...)
Yael Martínez Mexico is one of the largest producers of illegal poppies in the world. One of the main arguments used for the declaration of the war against drugs that includes the eradication of the crop, withou (...)
Yael Martínez Portrait of a young man living in a community that grows poppies. Guerrero, Mexico 9 February, 2021. Intervened photography. © Yael Martínez | Magnum Photos
Yael Martínez A wedding of the indigenous community Na savi in ​​Arroyo Prieto. Guerrero, Mexico. 2021 © Yael Martínez | Magnum Photos
Yael Martínez A police group guards the municipal president of Cochoapa el Grande in a ritual on the Cerro de la Garza.Indigenous rituals have undergone significant cultural and social changes due to the illegal (...)
Yael Martínez The hand of a peasant and the poppy grater. Malinaltepec, Guerrero, Mexico. 12 February, 2021. Intervened photography © Yael Martínez | Magnum Photos
Yael Martínez A child plays inside her home in the comunnity of Loma Canoa in Cochoapa el grande. Although Cochoapa el Grande is one of the poppy producing municipalities, the poverty rates are among the lowest (...)
Yael Martínez A landscape of The mountain at night. Tlapa, Guerrero, Mexico. 12 February, 2021. Intervened photography. © Yael Martínez | Magnum Photos

Susan Meiselas

Fifty years ago, I began to photograph girl shows across New England. In 1976, I published Carnival Strippers in black and white. This year, I began to revisit my archive and rediscovered some early color slides, which I had stored away. I’ve just brought together a new volume titled Making Of which includes color photographs, contact sheets, notes, and other ephemera, alongside a reprint of the original book Carnival Strippers. I wanted to add more layers to a project that continues to provoke ongoing questions as relevant now as they were then.

Rafal Milach

2021 was an another year of protests. In January politicised Constitutional Court introduced a nearly total abortion ban. People took to the streets all over the country despite of the Covid-19 pandemic peak. Few months later 30 years old Iza from the small town in southern Poland died because doctors were afraid to make a decision to abort the foetus. I’m writing these lines a day before the parliamentary voting on introduction of the total abortion ban.

Rafal Milach Women's Strike protests against the near total abortion ban. Warsaw, Poland. 26.10.2020 © Rafal Milach | Magnum Photos
Rafal Milach Just after the politicized Constitutional Court published the bill about a near total abortion ban, people took to the streets all over Poland. 99 days passed between the declaration and implementa (...)
Rafal Milach Women's Strike protests agains the near total abortion ban. Warsaw. Poland. 26.10.2021 © Rafal Milach | Magnum Photos
"Abortion Means Life" protests against the total abortion ban in front of Parliament. Warsaw, Poland. 02.12.2021
Rafal Milach Just after the politicized Constitutional Court published the bill about a near total abortion ban, people took to the streets all over Poland. 99 days passed between the declaration and implementa (...)
Rafal Milach Women's Strike protests against the near total abortion ban. Warsaw, Poland. 23.10.2021 © Rafal Milach | Magnum Photos
Rafal Milach Anti-governmental protest "We March for Freedom. We March for All". Various groups and organisations joined Women's Strike in the protest that took place on the 39th anniversary of introduction of (...)
Rafal Milach More than 150,000 people marched in the "To Warsaw" protest against the near-total abortion ban protest. The protest was organised by the Women's Strike and other feminist organisations. People fro (...)
Rafal Milach Independent Warsaw - In the name of Mother, Daughter, Sister" Protest organised by Women's Strike on the occasion of the 102nd anniversary of granting Polish women voting rights. It was the 38th da (...)
Rafal Milach Micro protest mocking the inadequate police performance within the recent Women's Strike. The group called Voluntary Ordinary Things Protection Unit (Ochotnicza Straż Zwyklych Obiektów- OSZO) gathe (...)

Emin Özmen

I wish I could say that the year 2021 was the year of the slow and awaited return to normal life. I had certainly forgotten that normal life, despite some moments of grace, is also synonymous with a return to turbulent events spiral. In Turkey, my country, the year was rough for many reasons. The return to normal life began with students protests and women marching for their rights after the country withdrew from the Istanbul Convention. Shortly before the summer, I was able to join a courageous and caring family of Kurdish nomads, to follow them in their transhumance. A welcomed break with nature and silence. Then the chaotic atmosphere, which seems never to leave Turkey, came back. After the Taliban victory in Afghanistan, thousands of people crossed the Iranian border to enter Turkey. Their looks still haunt me. At the same time, summer forest fires devastated the country. Remained out of control for weeks, they were of an unprecedented scale.They took the lives of eight people and devastated a priceless wildlife. It has since become difficult for me to continue documenting the many torments that continue to plague Turkey. But I keep the few drops of hope that I have left to wish that the year 2022 will finally give my compatriots some respite.

Emin Özmen For several weeks students and professors are protesting President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s appointment of a new rector in one of the most prestigious university of Turkey (Bogazici University, Istan (...)
Emin Özmen Despite police obstruction, Turkish women were determined to make their voices heard on International Women’s Day – and draw attention to the high rate of femicides and Turkish women's poor represe (...)
Emin Özmen At least 42 students were detained outside of Istanbul's main court on March 26th, as they gathered to support Bogazici University students, who were themselves arrested for displaying a rainbow fl (...)
Emin Özmen At least 42 students were detained outside of Istanbul's main court on March 26th, as they gathered to support Bogazici University students, who were themselves arrested for displaying a rainbow fl (...)
Emin Özmen People gathered and stand for their rights moment before riot police fires tear gas, rubber bullets and detained dozens of people, during a march in support of LGBT+ rights. Government hostility (...)
Emin Özmen People gathered and stand for their rights moment before riot police fires tear gas, rubber bullets and detained dozens of people, during a march in support of LGBT+ rights. Government hostility (...)
Emin Özmen People carry an injured woman, as riot police fired tear gas, rubber bullets and detained dozens of people during a march in support of LGBT+ rights. Government hostility toward LGBT+ individuals (...)
Emin Özmen Masum, 9 years old, rests near the creek. Because of the pandemic, schools were closed for months. Masum stopped going to school and has not returned since. Distance learning is very difficult fo (...)
Emin Özmen Cetin 12 years old, plays with his goat. He loves animals, especially the young ones. He left school at the beginning of the pandemic and does not want to go back. He says "I only miss my friends (...)
Emin Özmen Migrants hide near rocks after fleeing to avoid being caught by the Turkish gendarmerie. The Turkish government has intensified security near the Turkish-Iranian border as hundreds of people fro (...)
Emin Özmen Migrants rest near rocks after fleeing to avoid being caught by the Turkish gendarmerie. The Turkish government has intensified security near the Turkish-Iranian border as hundreds of people fro (...)
Emin Özmen After having spotted a Turkish gendarmerie car with all lights on and sirens wailing driving towards them, migrants run away to avoid being caught. The Turkish government has intensified securit (...)
Emin Özmen People try to extinguish a wildfire in Dalaman, Mugla. Eight people have died in the fires ravaging Turkey's Mediterranean and Aegean coasts, described as the worst in decades. Mugla, Turkey. 8 Aug (...)
Emin Özmen A gendarme pours water into his eyes as he tries to extinguish a wildfire in Dalaman, Mugla. Eight people have died in the fires ravaging Turkey's Mediterranean and Aegean coasts, described as the (...)
Emin Özmen People try to extinguish a wildfire in Dalaman, Mugla. Eight people have died in the fires ravaging Turkey's Mediterranean and Aegean coasts, described as the worst in decades. Mugla, Turkey. 08 Au (...)

Mark Power

In spite of everything, 2021 has been memorable, at least on a personal level. My partner Jo and I finally tied the knot after 32 years together, our son Milligan moved to London to start university and our daughter Chilli returned to the capital to begin a new career. As a result, we now have so-called ‘Empty Nest Syndrome’ in our house. Oh, and one other thing of (considerable) note: my beloved Leicester City won the FA Cup for the first time in its history.
Professionally speaking, I’ve spent much of the year in my studio working on two books. Firstly, Terre à l’Amende, (pictures made in Guernsey two or three years ago) was published by GOST in September. Secondly I’m making a new, revised and expanded edition of my first book, The Shipping Forecast, which will be available next year. In both cases I made use of a huge sheet of magnetic steel recently installed in the studio, which has revolutionised the way I edit and sequence my work. Here’s an iPhone snap of 143 outtakes from the original book, published 25 years ago, many of which I’m considering for the new version.
Mark Power Outside my studio, I spent some time in a remote wood in Surrey, where my extended family has owned a caravan since the 1960s. I began (tentatively) to photograph the wood, something I’ve been mean (...)
Mark Power In September/October I had the opportunity to visit Shinan Province in South Korea, an archipelago of 1004 islands in the southwest of the country. I went to photograph the ‘Getbol’, enormous UNESC (...)
Mark Power Okido Island, Shinan County, South Korea. 5 October 2021. © Mark Power | Magnum Photos
Mark Power Imjado Island, Shinan County, South Korea. 5 October 2021. © Mark Power | Magnum Photos
Mark Power Finally, it's almost two years since I last visited the US for my long-term project, Good Morning, America. However, I’ve now booked a ticket for the New Year, and in the meantime I’ll be keeping m (...)

Hannah Price

Oct. 27th 2020 is a short documentary published at several festivals this year. I also provided the photos for an essay in The Atlantic that told the story of Emmit Till who was tortured and murdered in Drew, Mississippi in 1955. For the New York Times, I shot M. Night Shyamylan and his daughter – my first celebrity commission.

Hannah Price The barn Where Emmett Till was tortured and killed in 1955. Drew. MS. USA. 30 June, 2021. © Hannah Price | Magnum Photos
Hannah Price The barn Where Emmett Till was tortured and killed in 1955. Drew. MS. USA. 7 April, 2021. © Hannah Price | Magnum Photos
Hannah Price Reverend Wheeler. Emitt Till's Cousin. Church held Till Funeral. Chicago, USA. 2021 © Hannah Price | Magnum Photos
Hannah Price M. Night Shyamalan & daughter Ishana Shyamalan. Newtoen Square, PA, USA. 21 January, 2021. © Hannah Price | Magnum Photos

Raghu Rai

Ellora is the epitome of rock-cut architecture.  These are the largest rock-cut monastery-temple caves existing of 34 caves, date back to 600 – 1000 CE.

What is so amazing, the craftsmen travelled from the top of the rocks, cutting and digging 100s of pillars – each pillar with most intricate carvings and each pillar has different pattern than the other. And within those pillars a large size of hall gets created and then there are deities like Buddha with his disciples in Buddhist caves. Then Shiva and his epic of miracles he created and other Hindu deities. And then comes the most amazing part of the Jain caves – one after another, amazing masterpieces- still surviving in perfect shape. All the caves have entrance from North west – reflecting side light on every sculpture and pillar and in other parts light is reflected from the floors- creating perfect ambience for a photographer to go mad, capturing the mesmerizing historical and religious magic.

2021 created this amazing challenge and possibilities of capturing this architectural marvel. There are already several books on Ajanta and Ellora caves, so the challenge was what vision one could share which will give a wholesome larger than life interpretation which is unique in its approach and style. The visitors at different times of the day, with different kind of reflected lights, their energies of faith and wonder and the power of sculptures within, made me go wild.

So the pandemic time became a celebration for me and I am blesssed with two very powerful books to be on our World Heritage Sites.

Lua Ribeira

This image is part of a personal project I started in April 2021. With this work, which is slowly forming, I would like to reflect on the present moment, especially in relation to younger generations and the global signs outlining the perception of the future.

Allesandra Sanguinetti

These portraits are made in Wisconsin, part of a larger body of work called Some Say Ice.

Jérôme Sessini

Jérôme Sessini Birmingham is the largest city in the state of Alabama. In the 1950s and 1960s, Birmingham gained worldwide attention for having become the center of the struggle for African-American civil rights. (...)
Jérôme Sessini Sunday mass at the Judah Worship Center. Birmingham is the largest city in the state of Alabama. In the 1950s and 1960s, Birmingham gained worldwide attention for having become the center of the (...)
Jérôme Sessini Birmingham, Alabama, USA. February 7, 2021. © Jérôme Sessini | Magnum Photos
Jérôme Sessini Romanza boxing gym. Fighter stretching after training. Mexico City, Mexico. 5 March, 2021. © Jérôme Sessini | Magnum Photos
Jérôme Sessini Hundreds of heroin addicts concentrate in western areas of Kabul, living under the bridge of Pul-e Sukhta. Addiction to drugs is an often underestimated phenomenon in Afghanistan. Thousands of pe (...)

Larry Towell

The covid travel restrictions gave me an opportunity to stay home, write and record a collection of thirty three ballads, many of which had been started in the fields of Central America, The Middle East, Africa, and Asia. They are field notes, true stories, and outright lies. Some were written, or finished, in a cabin I’d built at the back of my farm. The songs are being released next year as a three LP vinyl collection by GOST dedicated to the photojournalists who, against all odds, continue to go out into the world and get their hands dirty. Click the titles to hear the songs.

PTSD Song

I worked in Afghanistan between 2008 and 2011, mostly in the civilian sector, but also on military embeds with US soldiers who were considered occupiers by the locals. I enjoyed their company most of the time but took to heart the fact that, according to U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, more active duty soldiers committed suicide than died in combat. The field recordings that made it into the arrangement are from Afghanistan.

 Leica Camera Song

The story is in the monologue.

 Shenandoah (Highway of Tears)

The melody and origin song is based on the nineteenth century folk ballad about a fur trader on the Missouri River who falls in love with the daughter of an Oneida chief. I re-wrote the lyrics to reference the Highway Of Tears, which runs from Prince Rupert to Prince George, British Columbia, where many indigenous women and girls have been murdered or gone missing. The strange sound in the background is a music saw which I play with a violin bow.

All songs written, arranged, and produced by Larry Towell.

 

Alex Webb

For me, 2021 was a year of transition, from finishing Waves, the pandemic logbook on Cape Cod with Rebecca Norris Webb (pub date: spring 2022), to a return to an ongoing exploration of American cities that I’d begun in 2014. Here’s a selection of my recent images from three U.S. cities: Brooklyn, New York; New Bedford, Massachusetts; and Cincinnati, Ohio.

Patrick Zachmann

On the occasion of a retrospective at the Museum of Jewish Art and History, I brought out some photos I had taken at the Buttes-Chaumont Park in 1983, and never shown before, of old Ashkenazi Jews (from Eastern Europe), most of them survivors of the Nazi camps. They used to meet there every day to talk to each other, in Yiddish, about politics – many were former Bundists or Communists – or about “schmattès”, a term referring to tailor’s trade and dressmaking. As memories of a vanished Yiddish world fade, I tried to find relatives of these endearing men and women. We launched a search operation by posting 26 photos of the period on various Jewish websites. A historian pulled the threads of the first contacts, and we finally identified 15 people. Unfortunately all were deceased but here and there we found a niece or an emotional son. Among them, Bernard recognized his father, Fraïm Grinfeld, whom I photographed in front of his father’s portrait.

Patrick Zachmann Jacques and Hélène Grabstock (right). Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. Paris, France. 1983. © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Jews from Eastern Europe. Parc des Buttes-Chaumont, Paris, France. 1983. © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. Paris, France. 1983 © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. Paris, France. 1983 © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. Paris, France. 1983 © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. Paris, France. 1983 © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. Paris, France. 1983 © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Jacob (Jacques) Katz, an Ashkenazi Jew, reading a Yiddish newspaper. Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. Paris, France. 1983 © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Preparation fot Patrick Zachmann's exhibition "Voyages de mémoire" (Journeys in memory") at the Museum of Art and History of Judaism. Paris, France. November 2021. © Patrick Zachmann | Magnum Photos
Patrick Zachmann Patrick Zachmann's exhibition "Voyages de mémoire" (Journeys in memory") at the Museum of Art and History of Judaism. Here, Bernard Grinfeld, son of Fraïm Grinfeld, on the picture behind him taken (...)
Patrick Zachmann Patrick Zachmann's exhibition "Voyages de mémoire" (Journeys in memory") at the Museum of Art and History of Judaism. Here, Bernard Grinfeld, son of Fraïm Grinfeld, by the picture behind him taken (...)
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