Japan 1945: Hiroshima Aftermath • Wayne Miller • Magnum Photos

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Japan 1945: Hiroshima Aftermath

One month after the American atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Wayne Miller photographed the devastation of the city and its people

Wayne Miller

Wayne Miller Destruction caused by the atomic bomb blast. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos

On August 6, 1945, the U.S. bomber Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb named ‘Little Boy’ on Hiroshima, a Japanese city with a population of about 300,000. The force of the atomic blast was greater than 20,000 tons of TNT. According to U.S. statistics, 60,000 – 70,000 people were killed by the bomb. Other statistics show that 10,000 others were never found, and more than 70,000 were injured. Nearly two-thirds of the city was destroyed.

 

Wayne Miller An elderly lady in a makeshift hospital in the bank of Kango Ginku. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller Victims are treated in the Kangyo Ginko bank. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller Victims find refuge in a makeshift hospital in the bank building of Kango Ginku. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller Dr. Hisikichi Tokoda in the operating room at Shinagawa Hospital. Tokyo, Japan. August, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller The epicenter of the atomic blast where Army barracks once stood. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller Remains from the blast. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos

Three days later, on August 9, the day after the U.S.S.R. declared war on Japan, another atomic bomb called ‘Fat Man’ was dropped on the city of Nagasaki, which had a population of 250,000. About 40,000 people were killed by the Nagasaki bomb, and about the same number injured. On August 14, Japan agreed to the Allied terms of surrender.

Wayne Miller Civilians crowd into trains heading to Tokyo. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller Wounded lie in a makeshift hospital. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller Japanese workers begin cleaning a bombed building. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller Japanese soldiers and civilians crowd trains bound for Tokyo. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos
Wayne Miller Japanese soldier walks through the site where army barracks once stood. Hiroshima, Japan. September 8, 1945. © Wayne Miller | Magnum Photos