Inside Guantanamo • Peter van Agtmael • Magnum Photos

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Politics

Inside Guantanamo

Peter van Agtmael discusses visiting the United States military prison and how it represents America’s collective forgetfulness when it comes to war

Peter van Agtmael

Peter van Agtmael An outdoor cage shown during a press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush i (...)

Trump promised to “load up” the military prison in the US navel base Guantánamo Bay in Cuba with “some bad dudes,”  but since then very little has been said by the president on its future. However, in July 2017, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions described the secure facility as a “very fine place for holding these types of dangerous criminals,” hinting that there may be plans to reinvigorate activity at Guantanamo. The prison and its current 41 inhabitants have slipped from the news agenda, which argues Magnum’s Peter van Agtmael, is symptomatic of America’s “steady forgetting” when it comes to its wars and their consequences.

Peter van Agtmael, who has spent a near decade documenting America’s wars and their rippling effects back home in the States, visited Guantanamo Bay in January 2017. Here, he discusses his trip, in light of his ongoing dedicated exploration of war, America, politics and society.

Peter van Agtmael Housing at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. Guantanamo Bay. Cuba. 2017. © Peter van Agtmael | Magnum Photos
Peter van Agtmael The prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush in 2002. It was pledged to be closed by Obama (...)
Peter van Agtmael A prison guard outside of Camp 6 (where detainees are held) during a press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. Ground rules to media decree no identifiable (...)

Why did you choose to photograph Guantanamo?
I have been photographing the shadow of 9/11 in Iraq, Afghanistan, America and throughout the world since 2006, but had never been to Guantanamo. It is one of the most important symbols of this era of American history, and I had long intended to visit.

What does it represent to you?
For me, Guantanamo represents how casually the United States seemed to be able to undermine its supposed values when it felt under threat. By most definitions, Guantanamo has been a failure of morality, of the sanctity of the judicial system, of politics, and of intelligence gathering.

Peter van Agtmael The outside of Camp 5 shown during a press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. (...)
Peter van Agtmael Wall decorations at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay.Guantanamo Bay. Cuba. 2017. © Peter van Agtmael | Magnum Photos
Peter van Agtmael A press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush in 2002. It was pledged to be (...)
Peter van Agtmael A cell shown during a press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush in 2002. (...)

"For me, Guantanamo represents how casually the United States seemed to be able to undermine its supposed values when it felt under threat."

- Peter van Agtmael
Peter van Agtmael A press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush in 2002. It was pledged to (...)

Was it what you expected?
In some ways it is what I expected. I try not to look at too many pictures of a place before I go, but access to Guantanamo is so narrow and has been ongoing for so many years that I had a pretty good sense of the kinds of pictures I would be able to take. Inevitably, there is overlap with other photographers. The thing that surprised me the most is the area outside of the prison camp. The camp itself looks much like expected- a high security prison. However, the area around it just appears to be a mid-size American town plopped down onto the coastline of Cuba. There are outdoor movie theaters, McDonald’s, strip malls, bars etc. – then you drive down a long road and you are at this iconic prison camp. It’s incredibly surreal.

There are some very unique decorative items pictured. Could you describe what it was like there, and what atmosphere the decoration created?
The decoration was quite strange. There are color xeroxes of the paintings made by prisoners. Plenty of floral still lives, idyllic landscapes, etc. Of course, anything that hints at emotion or controversy is not put on display. I’d love to see what has been confiscated.

Peter van Agtmael Detainees in Camp 6 during a press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush in (...)
Peter van Agtmael Detainees in Camp 6 during a press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush in (...)
Peter van Agtmael People stand for the national anthem at an outdoor movie theater at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. The movie was "La-La Land". Guantanamo Bay. Cuba. 2017. © Peter van Agtmael | Magnum Photos

How restrictive is the access?
Media are not allowed to photograph prisoners in an identifiable way. The whole process is a bit strange. You are on a press tour with a dozen or so other journalists. You have very limited access to the prison, and then only for brief periods of time. The guards usher you into a dark, narrow observing area where you can watch the prisoners through layers of thick glass and chain link fencing. It creates a surreal spectacle. The prisoners don’t know you are watching them. The time is so short that you have to think of creative ways to frame the images without identifying features, all while other photographers are jostling for position. After the brief visit, you are taken to ‘Operational Security,’ where a press representative reviews every one of your photos and deletes the ones that he perceives are too identifiable.

The whole thing is a bizarre charade, because there are only a few dozen prisoners left, and all their faces and names are known. The ironic thing is that the prison claims it is following the Geneva Convention about taking photographs of prisoners without consent. “I’d be more than happy to ask for consent, in fact I’d prefer it” I said to one of the guards, but of course you aren’t allowed any contact with the prisoners, so the whole thing comes across as a spectacle. You only really get hints of the things that have happened in Guantanamo.

Peter van Agtmael T-Shirts for sale at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. A dining facility (called a "Galley") at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay.Guantanamo Bay. Cuba. 2017 © Peter van Agtmael | Magnum Photos
Peter van Agtmael A Jamaican restaurant at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. Guantanamo Bay. Cuba. 2017. © Peter van Agtmael | Magnum Photos
Peter van Agtmael T-Shirts for sale at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. Guantanamo Bay. Cuba. 2017. © Peter van Agtmael | Magnum Photos
Peter van Agtmael A television plays news of President Trump's "Muslim Ban" at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. Cuba. 2017. © Peter van Agtmael | Magnum Photos

"The guards usher you into a dark, narrow observing area where you can watch the prisoners through layers of thick glass and chain link fencing."

- Peter van Agtmael
Peter van Agtmael Camp 6 during a press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush in 2002. It wa (...)

Trump promised to “load it up with bad dudes”. Do you get the sense that this high security facility is very much out of sight out of mind in the public consciousness?
Early in Obama’s administration it was a campaign rallying cry. Now, you hardly ever hear it mentioned. To my mind it’s part of the steady forgetting America has been doing about these wars and their consequences, while they continue to rage.

Peter van Agtmael A press tour of the prison camp at the U.S. military installation in Guantanamo Bay. 41 detainees are currently held there. The camp was established by George W. Bush in 2002. It was pledged to (...)