Description

Are you about to embark on a personal photographic project and looking for feedback on your edits, ideas and approach? Do you have a long-term project that you need a fresh perspective on to identify underlying themes? Are you interested in working with someone who will get to know you and help elevate your vision for your body of work?

Through multiple interactive online sessions, this 3-month mentorship will help you to identify next steps in the production process of a long term or personal project. Magnum photographers will guide their mentees on all aspects of the creative process: from concept development, and editing and sequencing, to the process of discovering and making a long-term project that you’re passionate about, to practical advice on photographing in the field.

This mentorship provides an opportunity to work one-on-one with a Magnum photographer at your own pace over the course of several months.

A series of 8 online photography mentoring sessions lasting one hour each, the program will be organized over the course of three to six months, depending on your preferences and the areas personal to you that require development.

This mentorship offers:

  • Long term guidance on technical, ethical, theoretical and aesthetic issues
  • Ideas Development
  • Editing and Sequencing
  • Workflow
  • Output and presentation

Deadline for applications: 

25 November, 2020

Schedule:

Email in advance to schedule sessions with your mentor. Schedule is subject to the Magnum photographer’s availability.

I’m happy to help those interested in conceiving and executing their personal long term projects.

Matt Black

About your mentor

Matt Black is from California’s Central Valley, an agricultural region in the heart of the state. His work has explored the connections between migration, poverty, agriculture, and the environment in his native rural California and in southern Mexico.

He has traveled over 100,000 miles across 46 U.S. states for his project The Geography of Poverty.  Other recent works include The Dry Land, about the impact of drought on California’s agricultural communities, and The Monster in the Mountains, about the disappearance of 43 students in the southern Mexican state of Guerrero.  Both of these projects, accompanied by short films, were published by The New Yorker.

His work has appeared regularly in TIME Magazine, The New Yorker, The California Sunday Magazine, and other publications.  He has been honored three times by the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Prize, including their top honor for journalism. In 2015, he received the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Award for Humanistic Photography, and was named a senior fellow at the Emerson Collective. He lives in Exeter, a small town in the Central Valley.

 

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