Description

Paolo Pellegrin joined NASA to document the changing Antarctic in November 2017. He shot the pictures from a helicopter, mostly with no visible horizon. This method produced a set of images that are both graphic and spectral, as well as offering an illusion of an unknowable, untouchable force. But beyond the abstract, the photos also convey specifics; a calved iceberg flowing through frozen seawater known as pancake ice, a crevasse measuring a few thousand feet or a 100-ft.-tall iceberg floating in the open sea. This project is therefore as much a document of proof as it is a visual wonder.

There is always the desire to witness and inform. I try to be careful, but either you do something or you don't; my choice so far has been to go places.

Paolo Pellegrin
© Paolo Pellegrin | Magnum Photos

Paolo Pellegrin was born in 1964 in Rome. He studied architecture at L’Università la Sapienza, Rome, before studying photography at L’istituto Italiano di Fotografia.

Between 1991 and 2001 Pellegrin was represented by Agence VU in Paris. He was a contract photographer for Newsweek for ten years. Pellegrin is one of the world’s leading photojournalists who has documented many of this generation’s major disasters and conflicts, from revolutions to wars to tsunamis.

Pellegrin wishes his work to “create a bridge...to use photography to say something that goes beyond the surface, that vibrates, that resonates.” This approach has lead him to photograph in Lebanon, Iran, Palestine, Romania, Afghanistan, Libya, Cuba, the United States, Mali, Egypt, Algeria, Haiti, Tunisia, and Indonesia. In 2001 he became a Magnum Photos nominee and a full member in 2005.

© Paolo Pellegrin | Magnum Photos

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