Ban the Bomb • Sim Chi Yin • Magnum Photos

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Sim Chi Yin A Titan II Missile in its silo at a former intercontinental ballistic missile site in Arizona, now the Titan Missile Museum. The Titan II was the largest and heaviest missile ever built by the Unit (...)

The Nobel Peace Prize Centre in Oslo is currently exhibiting an exhibition that maps the enormity of the global nuclear threat, while paying tribute to this year’s Nobel Peace Prize laureate, ICAN, an organization working towards the ban of all nuclear weapons. Magnum nominee Sim Chi Yin’s commision, Fallout, will be on display.

Ban the Bomb is a reflection on the human experience with nuclear weapons in the past and in the present. Through sound, photos, and artifacts, the audience is taken back to the disaster when the atomic bombs hit Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Personal belongings of victims of the 1945 nuclear bombs are presented for the first time in Northern Europe.

The belongings are presented alongside unique photographs by this year’s Peace Prize photographer, visual artist Sim Chi Yin. Her photo series Fallout shows how today’s nuclear threat is visible in the landscape of two of the world’s nuclear powers. On commission for the Nobel Peace Center, Sim Chi Yin traveled along the border of North Korea and across six American states to photograph for the Nobel Peace Prize exhibition.

“I set out to create a series of images pairing the landscapes of North Korea with those of the United States – which are the only country to test nuclear weapons in the 21st Century and the only country to use them. I found some interesting, uncanny parallels, which led me to reflect on the human experience with nuclear weapons, past and present. Given the current global worries over the recent North Korean missile tests and the war of words between Pyongyang and Washington, it feels particularly timely to reflect on this issue. -Sim Chi Yin