Magnum Photos Now: Photography, Journalism, and Legacy • Magnum Photos

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Philip Jones Griffiths Confused urban warfare was such that Americans were shooting their staunchest supporters. Refugees under fire. The battle for Saigon. Vietnam. 1968 © Philip Jones Griffiths | Magnum Photos
Philip Jones Griffiths US 9th Division soldier during fighting in Saigon. Saigon. South Vietnam. 1968. © Philip Jones Griffiths | Magnum Photos
Philip Jones Griffiths Saigon. South Vietnam. 1967 © Philip Jones Griffiths | Magnum Photos
Philip Jones Griffiths Children playing on waste ground. Middlesbrough. England. GB. 1976. © Philip Jones Griffiths | Magnum Photos
Philip Jones Griffiths Called a "little tiger" for killing two "Vietcong women cadre" - his mother and teacher, it was rumoured. Vietnam. 1968 © Philip Jones Griffiths | Magnum Photos
Philip Jones Griffiths In the narrow terraced streets built for the working people of Northern Ireland (every house except the last needs only three walls), the closely knit communities of differing religious persuasions (...)
Philip Jones Griffiths The incongruities of daily life in the urban war zone. For years, the people of Northern Ireland lived in a strange and strained symbiosis with the occupying British army. Northern Ireland. 1973. © Philip Jones Griffiths | Magnum Photos
Philip Jones Griffiths Nannies Outside No.10. Downing Street was open to the public in those days and each afternoon the same nannies would pause to chat up the policemen on duty. England. GB. 1959. © Philip Jones Griffiths | Magnum Photos

March 2018 will mark ten years since the death of acclaimed Magnum photojournalist, Philip Jones Griffiths. His work stands as an irreplaceable document of the latter half of the 20th century, and he is best known for his landmark book, Vietnam Inc., which had a major impact on the public perception of the Vietnam War. Noam Chomsky observed of Vietnam Inc.: “If anybody in Washington had read that book, we wouldn’t have had these wars in Iraq or Afghanistan.”

A discussion at the Barbican, part of Magnum’s ongoing talk series, will explore how the legacy, archive, and ethics of a committed photojournalist can live on following their death, and be made available for future generations. Professor Julian Stallabrass will be joined in discussion by Philip Jones Griffiths’ Foundation trustees Katherine Holden and Fanny Ferrato, and Director of Trolley Books, Hannah Watson.