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Newsha Tavakolian Asma Kaouech, 25, leads the Fani Raghman Ani group, an association defending human rights in Tunisia. Tunis, Tunisia. August 2017. © Newsha Tavakolian | Magnum Photos

The 8th edition of Cortona On the Move international festival of photography opens to the public on July 12 and runs until September 30, 2018. As usual, dozens of exhibitions will be located in and around the historic town centre and the DeMedici fortress of Girifalco in Italy. Throughout the summer there will be exhibitions, events and discussions with leading lights of the profession.

The festival is organised by Associazione Culturale ONTHEMOVE with the artistic direction of Arianna Rinaldo. This year, the artistic director chose to focus attention on female photographers, those photojournalists, artists and producers of documentaries who investigate our world to bring us intimate stories and worldly narratives that must be told.

For the first time ARENA – Video and Beyond, sponsored by Canon Cinema Eos, will feature in the festival. It is a new category of Cortona On the Move that presents experimental video, installations and multiplatform work created by photographers that employ digital stills, film and all related technology. The section is directed and curated by Liza Faktor and Amber Terranova.

The full line-up and programme of events can be found at Cortona On the Move’s website here. Here’s a rundown of the Magnum activity you can expect to see.

Alex Webb NICARAGUA. Puerto Cabezas. 1992. Miskito children. © Alex Webb | Magnum Photos

30th anniversary of the Sakharov Prize

Since 1988 the European Parliament has been awarding the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought to individuals and organizations that have made an exceptional contribution to the fight for human rights. To mark the 30th anniversary of the prize, the European Parliament, together with Magnum Photos, presents a new documentary project that profiles four human rights activists from around the world.

They Defend our Freedoms – 30 years of the Sakharov Prize gives a voice to these unsung heroes, presenting an immersive journey into their daily lives as seen through the diverse perspectives of Magnum photographers.

Jérôme Sessini travelled to remote Cambodian villages with activist Samrith Vaing, documenting the life of indigenous minorities contending with forced eviction. Newsha Tavakolian photographed Asma Kaouech, a young Tunisian activist who tries to prevent teenagers from becoming radicalized. In Ethiopia, lawyer Ameha Mekonnen, photographed by Enri Canaj, advocates for journalists facing censorship from government authorities. In Bosnia, Bieke Depoorter accompanied former Balkan War refugee Jadranka Miličević in her effort to empower women.

Bieke Depoorter Jadranka driving home in Sarajevo, Sarajevo. Bosnia and Herzegovina. August 2017. © Bieke Depoorter | Magnum Photos

Sim Chi Yin: Fallout

One is the only country to have tested nuclear weapons in the 21st century. The other is the first country to have tested and used them. North Korea and the United States are at two ends of the nuclear equation – but have recently been locked in a dangerous cycle of threats and counter-threats. Documentary photographer and new Magnum nominee Sim Chi Yin travelled 6,000km along the China-North Korea border and through six states in United States, to create a series of images reflecting on humans’ experience with nuclear weapons, past and present.

Sim Chi Yin A Titan II Missile in its silo at a former intercontinental ballistic missile site in Arizona, now the Titan Missile Museum. The Titan II was the largest and heaviest missile ever built by the Unit (...)

Bieke Depoorter: As it may be

Award in collaboration with the PHmuseum 2018 Grant

For her book As it may be, Bieke Depoorter traveled to Egypt regularly from the beginning of the revolution in 2011, in times of turmoil and suspicion, where private life is often shielded. She asked people she met by chance if she could spend the night at their homes. Women, their husbands and children shared their daily life, their food and even their bed with her.

Nevertheless, the consciousness of her status as an outsider, both culturally and as a photographer started to grow. In 2017, she revisited the country with the first draft of this book, inviting others, to write comments directly onto the photographs. Contrasting views on country, religion, society and photography arise between people who would otherwise never cross paths.

Read the feature on As it may be here.

Bieke Depoorter (Translation of the written text below)- You can stay with me no problem, a day, a week, a month. But taking pictures: no.- Sometimes all the borders · customs, traditions, doctrines - can mak (...)

Diana Markosian: Santa Barbara

With her project Santa Barbara, Armenian-American artist and photographer Diàna Markosian won the Happiness ONTHEMOVE international prize, promoted in partnership with Consorzio Vino Chianti.

“Santa Barbara explores immigration through the eyes of one family, my own. In Russia, the 1980s soap opera Santa Barbara — saturated with wealth and sun—was the first and, for a long time, the only American show available. For many families, it symbolized all of America, all of the West. My own family was no exception,” explained Diana Markosian. “Inspired by the show, my mother became a mail-order bride, taking my brother and I to California, to meet the man who would soon become her husband and take the place of my own father. This is a story of touching something that felt untouchable.” – Diana Markosian.

Diàna Markosian will receive her prize in Cortona on July 14, presented by Lorenzo Tersi, marketing manager of Consorzio Vino Chianti, while her work will be exhibited at Cortona On The Move, 2019 edition.

Diana Markosian "My family arrived in America in 1996. My mother described it as the arrival to nowhere, with the belief of going somewhere." © Diana Markosian | Magnum Photos