Cristina de Middel: In No Particular Order • Magnum Photos

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Upcoming Exhibition

Cristina de Middel: In No Particular Order

Cristina de Middel’s latest exhibition combines a selection of more than 70 prints from three major projects

Cristina de Middel

Cristina de Middel From the series "Midnight at the Crossroads". Legba (Eshu) starting his journey to America from the beaches of Ouidah. (Collaboration with Bruno Morais.) Benin. 2016. © Cristina de Middel | Magnum Photos

In No Particular Order brings together a selection of more than 70 prints from three major projects of Magnum nominee Cristina de Middel. The first-floor gallery space of the Magnum gallery in Paris is dedicated to Christina de Middel’s series Party. In an attempt to build a documentary object that pushes the limits of images, Party presents a deliberately personal approach to contemporary Chinese society. Using censorship to erase the parts of the text from Chairman Mao Tse-tung that are no longer in use, the resulting pages become a script where the matching images build a series of diptychs that dynamically raise the question of the real nature of Communism in China.

Cristina de Middel Spiral. From the series: The Party. China. 2013. © Cristina de Middel | Magnum Photos
Cristina de Middel From the series: The Party. China. 2013. © Cristina de Middel | Magnum Photos
Cristina de Middel From the series "Midnight at the Crossroads". The dynamic energy of Exu and his ambiguous character are described in various songs and legends. Exu uses many tricks to confuse the people around him (...)

The second-floor gallery space presents the Afronauts and Midnight at the Crossroads series. Afronauts is based on the documentation of an impossible dream that only lives in pictures. The artist starts from a real event that took place 50 years ago and rebuilds the documents, adapting them to her personal imagery. In 1964, still living the dream of recently gained independence, Zambia started a space program that would put the first African on the moon. But the financing never came, and one of the astronauts, a 16-year-old girl, got pregnant and had to quit. That is how the heroic initiative turned into an exoticized episode of African history, surrounded by wars, violence, and droughts.

 

Cristina de Middel Iko. From the series: Afronauts. 2011. © Cristina de Middel | Magnum Photos